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Cat food and treats

A great selection of dry cat food, wet cat food, cat treats and cat grass to discover on Zoomalia.
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2019 shopping guide and tips: Cat food and treats

Your cat's eating habits

The quality of the food your feed your cat is important to ensure he stays in top form. You should give you cat dietary supplements when necessary.


Killer instinct

While cats are perfectly domesticated, they also retain all their special predator instincts. Wild cats rarely eat their prey upon killing it; they will often find a quiet hideout to enjoy their meal undisturbed. Make sure your cat feels at ease when eating.


Reading labels


Whether wet or dry, cats prefer professional food over home-made food. Manufacturers develop the flavour and texture of their food to meet the feline needs and taste; among others, they love very fragrant food. You should always read labels detailing the composition, nutrients and protein. Please note, among other things, the magnesium content which, beyond 0.09%, predisposes feline urinary stones. Comparing products in this way will help you choose the right food that offers the best quality, truly worthy of the label "premium".
 
Dry foods are appetising for even finicky cat, easy to serve and remain in the bowl without strong odours. They clean cat's teeth during chewing, helping to prevent dental plaque and their regular consumption promotes compact and less odorous stools. Be sure to provide fresh water with dried foods!

Wet foods are highly appreciated by cats, especially those who love strong flavours. They are rich in nutrients, especially fibre useful for the constipated cat. They are also convenient foods for travel with their high moisture content (75%) that reduces thirst. Watch out that you don't overfeed your cat!

Vegetables facilitate digestion when offered in very small quantities, chopped, cooked and mixed with meat. They are low in fat and rich in protein, essential oils, vitamins, fatty acids and especially taurine, crucial to health of the eyes, heart and nervous system.


Eating habits


Varying food is very important, even more so for a kitten when it passes from breast milk to solid food, because he can quickly become attached to one in infancy and come to deny any other; which can lead to loss of appetite and even anorexia in adulthood. To correct this at a later stage, we can patiently serve him food new foods by mixing them with is favourite.

The adult cat requires approximately 30% protein, 20% fats, 37% carbohydrate (starches and fibre) and 13% of vitamins, minerals and other nutrients such as omega 3 and 6 and taurine. However, a neutered cat is less active and requires an appropriate food to combat weight gain. Look for a food that is 27% protein, 13% fat, 45% carbohydrate and 15% for other nutrients. And of course, avoid extra snacks and treats!

A cat during gestation and lactation needs more fat and taurine. An increase of 10% at most will suffice until the end of weaning.

Although cats are expected to live around twelve years, it is no longer uncommon to see cats exceed twenty years old. Older cats have different nutritional needs. Their immune system are weakened and free radicals increase, as well as the risk of kidney failure. The senior feline diet is easily digested (reducing fat to about 15% and increasing carbohydrates to 44%) since the appetite and assimilative capacity decrease; a consistency suitable for easy chewing; and finally, the supplement (about 14%) of fatty acids and antioxidant vitamins to fight free radicals. It must also retain a good percentage of protein (about 27%) and reduce phosphorus levels to preserve renal function.


Call a cat a cat

Every cat eats its own particular rhythm. It eats between ten and twenty times in a single day. Cats do not like to get their noses dirty while eating; so consider offering you cat his meals in a flat bowl. Add a bit of cat grass so that he can regurgitate his hair balls.


Tips related to cat food

    Cat flaps
    Cat litter
   
    Cat bowls and feeders
    Cat grooming and healthcare